Vintage Furniture trends that will suit your Letchworth Home

  • By Stephen Taylor
  • 20 Nov, 2017
Vintage furniture

Vintage furniture has never been more popular and interior design trends for 2018 show that people are continuing to use the past as an inspiration for their home décor. However, to get the best effect it’s best to keep with furniture that is in-keeping with the style of your home. Letchworth has a wide range of properties, from early 20th century homes from when the Garden City was first built, to 1970s homes on the larger estates, so there are lots of décor choices. Here are some furniture trends you might want to try.

Edwardian and Art Deco Furniture

Letchworth Garden City was established in the early 1900’s so older homes really suit this style of furniture. Less heavy and formal than the Victorian era, this furniture uses Art Nouveau prints, flowers, and pastel colours for a bright look. If you find furniture from this time, it is worth taking it to an Antique Furniture Restorer , perhaps to replace older fabrics or give it a French polish to give a new lease of life. If you live in one of Letchworth’s older homes, then this style can often enhance living or dining areas and makes a real impact.

The 1970s look

While the 1970s style is often referred to in less than complimentary ways, certain elements of the design are coming back into fashion . The good news is, this sort of style suits a lot of Letchworth homes built during the era, and there is a great deal of furniture from this period currently on the market. The bad news is that a lot of it is in quite poor condition. This is why much furniture from this decade is now being restored.

1970s interiors were colourful, mixing the mid-century styles with primary colours and trends from the era include:

●      Bold prints – from wall coverings to rugs

●      Dark woods

●      Clean lines

●      Pendant lamps

●      Bold carpeting and rugs

While you may not wish to go for a full 1970’s look, there are certain elements you could add to your home. For example, a sideboard or cocktail cabinet following sympathetic Furniture Restoration. A few prints can also add that 70s style, and many modern designers are taking inspiration, with everything from china to rugs having the distinctive prints.

1920s homes

In the 1920s, the arrival of many large businesses meant that Letchworth Garden City grew, and you can see surviving Art Deco styles in the town. If you have a home from this era, then luxury is the key, from exotic prints from around the world, to furniture with touches of gold. It’s worth investing in stylish antique furniture that can be restored.

If you’re trying to achieve a vintage look in your home, and have furniture that needs restoring, get in touch with Kendals on 01462 682000. Based at 5 Oakfield Corner, Works Road, Letchworth Garden City, Hertfordshire, SG6 1FB. We have clients across London, the South East and beyond.

By Stephen Taylor 27 Nov, 2017

Letchworth Garden City has some great places to buy antiques, from flea markets down The Wynd, to shops in the High Street and you will no doubt find something that catches your eye. While these places may afford some very rare finds, furniture can often be in poor condition from either having been stored or used over long periods of time and so they will require some degree of restoration. Whether you are planning to sell these pieces of furniture, or want to use them to complete your own collection, here are some ways that antique furniture can be improved and restored.

Re-upholstering

Armchairs, sofas, ottomans, indeed anything with a fabric covering can be re-upholstered to give the item a fresh look. You may like the shape of a piece of furniture but notice that the fabric is worn or dirty. By taking to a furniture restorer for re-upholstery, not only will the top cover fabric be replaced, but also buttoning, piping, and trims, so it will be usable again while retaining its vintage charm.

Older upholstered items can also be uncomfortable, and often sag or flatten over time. If you pick up a bargain at a car boot sale and subsequently find it to be uncomfortable when you get it home, then seats can be restored with new paddings, either traditional or modern, depending on the piece. Choosing fabrics can be enjoyable and allows for the finished article to fit with your existing furniture in your home.

Restoration

If you spot a bargain in a local antique shop, you will no doubt snap it up without looking too closely at the condition. However, when you buy antique furniture you can sometimes discover things that need repairing or that are not quite right when you get home. Restoration of furniture is usually straight forward if carried out by the experts, and some of the improvements that can be made include:

●      Removing scratches

●      Repairing joints

●      Splicing sections where damaged or missing

●      French polishing

●      Replacing of handles

●      Re leathering of Desks

This can turn an antique piece that is simply nice to look at into a beautiful piece of furniture for the home or to sell. Furniture from certain periods can fetch high prices, so if you want a particular item then it’s sometimes worth buying in a poor condition and getting it restored.

Restoration advice

You may have found a piece at one of Letchworth’s markets, and be wondering whether it’s valuable. After all, there have been a lot of stories about bargains at car boot sales that have turned out to be valuable. That’s why it’s so important to take your furniture to an expert to be restored, so they can carry out the restoration to the highest standard. If you have an antique piece, then it’s important it’s treated with respect. Many valuable items have been ruined by amateur restoration that has not been sympathetic to the style. A professional restorer will give you advice on the best way to proceed.

If you have antique furniture that needs to be restored, contact Kendals at 5 Oakfield Corner, Works Road, Letchworth Garden City, Hertfordshire, SG6 1FB. Simply call 01462 682000 to find out more.

By Stephen Taylor 20 Nov, 2017

Vintage furniture has never been more popular and interior design trends for 2018 show that people are continuing to use the past as an inspiration for their home décor. However, to get the best effect it’s best to keep with furniture that is in-keeping with the style of your home. Letchworth has a wide range of properties, from early 20th century homes from when the Garden City was first built, to 1970s homes on the larger estates, so there are lots of décor choices. Here are some furniture trends you might want to try.

Edwardian and Art Deco Furniture

Letchworth Garden City was established in the early 1900’s so older homes really suit this style of furniture. Less heavy and formal than the Victorian era, this furniture uses Art Nouveau prints, flowers, and pastel colours for a bright look. If you find furniture from this time, it is worth taking it to an Antique Furniture Restorer , perhaps to replace older fabrics or give it a French polish to give a new lease of life. If you live in one of Letchworth’s older homes, then this style can often enhance living or dining areas and makes a real impact.

The 1970s look

While the 1970s style is often referred to in less than complimentary ways, certain elements of the design are coming back into fashion . The good news is, this sort of style suits a lot of Letchworth homes built during the era, and there is a great deal of furniture from this period currently on the market. The bad news is that a lot of it is in quite poor condition. This is why much furniture from this decade is now being restored.

1970s interiors were colourful, mixing the mid-century styles with primary colours and trends from the era include:

●      Bold prints – from wall coverings to rugs

●      Dark woods

●      Clean lines

●      Pendant lamps

●      Bold carpeting and rugs

While you may not wish to go for a full 1970’s look, there are certain elements you could add to your home. For example, a sideboard or cocktail cabinet following sympathetic Furniture Restoration. A few prints can also add that 70s style, and many modern designers are taking inspiration, with everything from china to rugs having the distinctive prints.

1920s homes

In the 1920s, the arrival of many large businesses meant that Letchworth Garden City grew, and you can see surviving Art Deco styles in the town. If you have a home from this era, then luxury is the key, from exotic prints from around the world, to furniture with touches of gold. It’s worth investing in stylish antique furniture that can be restored.

If you’re trying to achieve a vintage look in your home, and have furniture that needs restoring, get in touch with Kendals on 01462 682000. Based at 5 Oakfield Corner, Works Road, Letchworth Garden City, Hertfordshire, SG6 1FB. We have clients across London, the South East and beyond.

By Stephen Taylor 02 Nov, 2017

Is Restoring Antique Furniture a Good Idea?

Some people love nothing more than revamping their home's interior every time the latest designer furniture becomes available while others prefer to decorate their property with timelessly stylish antiques. Indeed, antiques can add a sense of traditional luxury to any home, but they can also look old, worn and tattered if badly maintained.

The good news is that it's often possible to restore antique furniture to its former condition, but is it always a good idea to do so? You might wonder whether restoring your antiques would decrease their value or compromise their authenticity even though it seems logical that fixing items should make them more valuable.

Here at Kendals, we offer expert advice to people who want to know the answer to the enquiry in question, but we're also trusted furniture restorers that can return your antiques to their former glory. Our antique furniture restoration professionals will recommend the most appropriate course of action to take regarding your tattered furniture, which is why we're the go-to antique restorers in Letchworth Garden City.

To Restore or Not to Restore

Our experts will happily advise you on whether to rejuvenate your antiques or leave them in their current condition by taking these factors into consideration:

·         Is Your Antique a Masterpiece?

If your antique furniture item is rare, out of the ordinary or a classic example of fine craftsmanship, we may suggest avoiding restoration if there's a chance it could decrease your item's value. Many collectors aren't interested in antiques that barely resemble their original form and would rather buy a rare gem in its current condition, warts and all.

·         Who Made the Furniture?

We may discover that your antique furniture was crafted by a notable manufacturer or craftsmen, in which case restoring it might be a bad idea. Search your antique furniture for marks, signs or emblems that could give away its origins.

·         Is Restoration Really Required?

Most antique restoration specialists would agree that you should always choose the least invasive method for making furniture usable again. Perhaps all your antique needs is a light cleaning and a few missing handle replacements to make it look stylish in your home.

·         What Do You Intend to Do with Your Antique Furniture?

There might not be much point in restoring an antique that's going to be stored in your cellar regardless of its appearance. If you just want to add furniture to your antique collection rather than actually use it, you might want to avoid putting its value at risk by restoring it.

You Can Count on Us for Honest Furniture Repair Advice

At Kendals, we haven't earned a reputation for excellence by simply trying to push every antique collector we encounter into restoring their items. We've built a sterling reputation based on honesty and reliability, meaning you can trust any recommendations our furniture restorers offer.

Contact us today on 01462 682000 to speak to a trusted antique furniture expert, or bring your prized possessions to our location at 5 Oakfield Corner, Works Road, Letchworth, Garden City, SG6 1FB for a personal inspection.

By Stephen Taylor 02 Nov, 2017

How to Restore Your Antique Furniture

For some people, collecting antiques is a way of life, and there's plenty of money to be made if you know how to find the right antique furniture and locate a buyer. However, other people prefer to track down old furniture that they can use to decorate their home which is why they choose to restore said furniture to bolster their aesthetic appeal.

Here at Kendals, we are the go-to furniture restorers in Letchworth Garden City and you can trust our professionals to return your furniture to its former glory. Thanks to being located just off the A1(M), we are easily reachable from cities like London, Cambridge and Peterborough and we're always on hand to answer any questions you may have.

However, if you'd like to attempt to restore your own items without help from the antique restoration experts, you should follow the steps detailed in the guide below.

Return Your Furniture to its Former Glory

It is worth noting that you might lower an antique's value by restoring it, especially if you do a bad job. However, if you want to put your skills to the test, you will need to purchase the following items:

●      Dust mask

●      Work gloves

●      Brushes

●      Proprietary chemical stripper

●      Polish and wax remover

●      Fine steel wool (0000 gauge)

●      Sanding block and fine glass paper

●      Lint-free cloths

●      Wood stain

●      Polishes

●      Wax polish

Once you have the items listed above, you can attempt to restore old furniture by following these steps:

 

  1. Strip back Your furniture

It's likely that you'll make a mess when stripping back your furniture, so work outdoors if possible. If you must work indoors, remember to protect the floors and nearby furniture. Also ensure you have adequate ventilation. (Ensure you read the proprietary chemical stripper instructions carefully).  


  1. Neutralise the Chemical Stripper

Using a fine steel wool and methylated spirit, neutralise the chemicals on the previously polished surfaces.

 

  1. Lightly paper the Surfaces

After the stripping process, use fine glass paper and a sanding block to lightly sand the surfaces remembering to remove dust after.

 

  1. Colour Restoration

Furniture colours often fade over time and with exposure to sunlight, so you may need to balance the colour by using a wood stain before polishing.

 

  1. Apply Polish

Apply a layer of polish to the surfaces of your furniture.

 

  1. The Final Touches

Finally, coat the entire surface of your item with a furniture wax and burnish.

 

Antique Restoration Made Simple

In reality, professional furniture restorers train for years to become adept at in their craft. Remember, you could compromise the quality and value of your antique if you make any mistakes during the restoration process.

If you would rather allow the experts restore your furniture, you should contact Kendals today on 01462 682000. Alternatively, come and speak to us in person by visiting us at 5 Oakfield Corner, Works Road, Letchworth Garden City, Hertfordshire, SG6 1FB.

By Stephen Taylor 02 Nov, 2017

Antique Furniture ‘Marriages’ and How to Spot Them

In the world of antique restorations, one of the most important issues to watch for is a ‘marriage’, which means that two different pieces of furniture have been joined together in something of an unholy union. Married antiques are worth significantly less than the original, and an amateur collector could easily be duped into spending more for a married piece than it’s actually worth.

While some unscrupulous antique dealers would no doubt try to pass off a married piece as an original – even going so far as to marry two pieces with the hopes that the buyer doesn’t notice – it’s often not as nefarious as this. In fact, the way in which European furniture was manufactured in the 17th, 18th and 19th century lent itself to furniture marriages. As you’ll see in the next section, it was all part of the design.

Why Married Antique Furniture Exists

In the Old World, transporting large pieces of furniture was difficult, to say the least. Pieces had to be transported in carts, and they had to be light enough that a small team could lift and arrange them. With this in mind, it was best to manufacture furniture in pieces so that it could be easily transported and then assembled on site.

Of course, furniture that can be easily assembled is just as easy to disassemble. This meant that the end user could easily replace a broken or worn-out part of a piece of furniture without having to buy a new one. For example, if the table top had splintered, they could simply keep the base and put a new top on. The combination of old and new became a newly married piece of furniture.

How to Spot Married Antique Furniture

Married furniture may be functional, but its hodgepodge nature makes it inauthentic and therefore of little value to a collector. With that in mind, you have to be careful when shopping around for antiques.

As furniture restorers, we regularly see antiques brought in that are actually married pieces. With a bit of practice, these marriages are easy to spot. Here are some signs to look for:

·         Unusual proportions – Size the piece up. Does one component seem to overwhelm the rest? If so, you may be looking at a marriage.

·         Clashing styles – An antique that features an unlikely marriage of design styles is probably just that: a marriage.

·         Unmatched wood – A single piece of wood furniture is usually made from the same type of wood. At minimum, all wood components should be the same age. If part of the piece looks younger, it almost certainly is.

·         Mismatched hardware – Mismatched hinges, doorknobs, drawer pulls and other hardware are a dead giveaway.

·         Uneven finish – If the finish of one part of the piece looks different to another, you may have two married pieces that have been finished at two different times.

If you have an antique and aren’t sure whether it’s married, bring it by Kendals in Letchworth, Garden City. You’ll find us at 5 Oakfield Corner, Works Road. And if you need directions, give us a call on 01462 682000.

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